Remembering the years gone by on my birthday……………..

As it is my birthday today, I thought of  doing a pictorial on how my life has  progressed over the years. I was born on June 25, 1966. I know that it was  a Saturday and a Full Moon Day . From where I am today, my younger days seem a life time away. Going through old photo albums to look for some photos to put on my blog, I felt nostalgic for  the days gone by  but our lives can only move forward so we   have to focus on the future and hope things do not get too rough and its a smooth journey to the end of our days.

With my sisters and brother
With my sisters and brother
I think its my 10th birthday.
I think its my 10th birthday.
Off to school with my sisters when we lived in India
Off to school with my sisters when we lived in India
In my teens
In my teens
21st birthday.I remember the dress so well
21st birthday.I remember the dress so well
Early days as a reporter
Early days as a reporter
Studying journalsim
Studying journalism
Signing on the dotted line....
Signing on the dotted line….
Carefree days..............
Carefree days………….
First taste of Motherhood
First taste of Motherhood
And then the second one
And then the second one
Chilling out
Chilling out
Three generations
Three generations
At our sister Indini's birthdy -  June 16, 2013
At our sister Indini’s birthdy – June 16, 2013
 
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Birthday Stories………everyone has one to tell and remember

Yesterday, it was my birthday
I hung one more year on the line
I should be depressed
My life’s a mess
But I’m having a good time……..Paul Simon

 A few days ahead of my own birthday, I have decided to write about the anthology of birthday stories aptly titled Birthday Stories by Haruki Murakami which contains some of the best short stories I have had the pleasure of reading.

Murakami
Murakami

Published in 2006, it contains 13 short stories all of which have a birthday  theme.  Murakami has penned one of the stories himself titled Birthday Girl to be included in the anthology.

A birthday is usually a  day of celebration and fun but it can also become a memorable day for various other reasons. Reading through the collection selected by Murakami, one realizes that birthdays are also days that can become memorable for some strange reasons. It can be a day that brings back memories of a forgotten lover; a day one avoids spending time with the people who are closet to you or be a day one wants to spend by oneself.

My oldest son was born on my husband’s birthday so that is a birthday story we get to repeat from time to time. But I guess everyone has their own birthday story to tell and remember.

Book cover
Book cover

One story in the anthology in particular titled The Moor by Russell Banks has got me so hooked that, since I first read it more than two years ago,   I have read and re-read it so many times that I know most of it by heart.  As Murakami says in the introduction to The Moor, “the dark sense of pain that lingers after you have finished reading it” makes it an irresistible story.

In the introduction to the anthology, Murakami gives the reader an insight into what a birthday means to him.  That, for me, is a separate story by itself.

The book begins with the words of a well-known song by Paul Simon – Have a Good Time.   It’s worth a listen.

Chance encounters that enrich our lives……………

“Chance encounters are what keep us going.”  – Haruki Murakami – Kafka on the beach.

A few days ago, I opened up the page in a weekend newspaper which carries appreciations written about people who have passed away. Among them was the picture of a lady whose face looked familiar. I read the name and realized she was someone I had met briefly about two years ago. We met briefly but she had left a lasting impression on me. She was beautiful and kind and even though it was our first ever meeting (and sadly the last) she opened up to me as if I were an old friend. I instantly developed an admiration for her and I repeated the story of my meeting with her to many of my others friends and family members.

It all started when I decided I should act to make my dream of opening up a reading room cum library a reality. I had been speaking about it to my close friends for long but all I did was talk and forget about it. So I decided to place an advertisement in the newspaper looking for a place I could open up such a place. I was looking for a place where the rent would be low but be a centrally located place in the city. (A near impossibility given the high rates for rent these days). I placed my email address in the advertisement for those interested to contact me.

A few days later I had an email from a lady who wrote saying she did not have a place for me to rent but she could give me some books. Being the book crazy person I am, I was thrilled and called up the number she had mentioned in the email. She answered and asked me to come over the following Sunday afternoon. I still remember it so well. When I arrived at the plush apartment she lived in, she greeted me with a friendly smile and we got chatting. She asked me what I did and I told her I was a journalist. Then she told me she herself had been selected while she was studying in the university to work as a freelance journalist but her boyfriend at the time had been against the idea and hence she did not pursue it. She had subsequently got married, moved to England, had kids and settled down to a life of domesticity. Now she was a grandmother and was more relaxed and was spending time traveling between London and Colombo. “I really regret I did not become a journalist. Things would have been very different in my life if I had,” she told me. Then we talked a little about our families and life in general and discussed her love for Indian television serials and books .She picked up from her shelf the books she liked the best and handed them to me. One in particular was a book on Marilyn Monroe,   which contains lovely pictures of the actress. It was one of her favorites, she told me, but said I could have it as she did not need it any more. I wanted to pay for the books but she was hesitant. After I insisted she asked me to give her a token amount which I did knowing very well that the money would not even cover the cost of two of the over a dozen books she  had so generously given me.marilynmonroeproject-2009112033457-mm_norman_mailer-original1

From the book on MM
From the book on MM

I was keen to meet her again before she left for England but it did not happen. After seeing the appreciation written about her by a group of her friends, I understood that while she had made a lasting impression on me during our meeting which lasted only about an hour, she had also left an indelible mark on many others in her lifetime.

We encounter kindness in the most unusual ways in our daily lives and meeting her was one such moment which I’ll remember as long as I live.

Dante Vs Dan Brown – Take your pick………………….

The recent release of Dan Brown’s latest best seller Inferno created a renewed interest in the works of the great Italian poet Dante Alighieri (1265-1321). Brown’s book draws continuous reference to Dante‘s masterpiece, Divine Comedy, to help the protagonist of his book to solve the riddle that could help to save nearly half the world’s population from annihilation. All very fanciful stuff and the book is more or less a typical Dan Brown kind of thriller but the author helps to enlighten the reader on the genius of the Italian Master and take the reader on a fascinating journey through the history of two great Italian cities – Florence and Venice.115

It’s true by the time I reached the last few pages of Brown’s book, I was worn out by the over description of roads, bridges, buildings, museums, people etc. and just wanted it to end but I was eager to read up more on Dante about who I knew nothing more than the fact he was an Italian poet who wrote the epic Divine Comedy.  Having turned the last page on Dan Brown’s Inferno, I opened up the page of a book I ve had for  long on my book shelf which contained a fascinating article on Dante.

I also downloaded an electronic version of the Divine Comedy but reading it is  no mean task  given its length and complexity but  the translation of it done by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow can be downloaded free of charge. Interpretation of poetry is at most times a  brain wrecking experience for me so while I  decided to go-slow  on the poem, I read up the more simplified description of  Divine Comedy which  I can share with all of you.

Dante
Dante

On Good Friday in the year 1300, Dante Alighieri, a citizen of the thriving Italian city-state of Florence found himself lost in a dark forest. Divine Comedy begins thus and describes the feelings of terror he encountered.

Inferno: Canto I

 “Midway upon the journey of our life

I found myself within a forest dark,

For the straightforward pathway had been lost.

Ah me! How hard a thing it is to say

What was this forest savage, rough, and stern?

Which in the very thought renews the fear.

Fleeing from its terrors, he encounters the Ghost of his favorite author, the Latin poet Virgil. The poet told Dante that he could escape from the forest only by taking a road that led down into Hell and through it to Purgatory and then onto Paradise. With Virgil as his guide, Dante undertakes the journey and begins the terrible descent.  Hell was a huge funnel-shaped pit with ledges circling its sides, on which the sinful suffered pains appropriate to their offences.

As the two climb down, Dante encounters some of his unimportant Florentine contemporaries as well as some well-known persons from history. The worst places in Hell are where he encounters Judas, the betrayer of Jesus and Brutus, the betrayer of Julius Caesar.

Virgil
Virgil

The two eventually leave Hell and come to the foot of Mount Purgatory which is in the exact opposite form of Hell, a peak rising up to the skies.  Like Hell, the peak has a series of circles inhabited by those who have committed various classes of sin.  Those guilty of sins such as pride were at the bottom of the mountain while those who were guilty of sins like lust were at the top. Unlike the lost souls of Hell, all the inhabitants of Purgatory were working, with the certainty of ultimate release from their sins.

When Dante emerges to the summit of Mount Purgatory, Virgil being a pagan is not allowed to pass   into the next region. Here Virgil is replaced  as guide  by Beatrice, a  woman Dante had  known and loved  in Florence and remained  the symbol of perfection to him ever since.  She married another man and had died young. Beatrice leads Dante into Paradise and in the celestial region; his journey becomes a weightless one.  Finally he is admitted to the Empyrean of God and the saints and here he acquires a new guide St Bernard. He is then led before the Virgin Mary   by whose intercession he is allowed to look into the light of the Trinity.

The Divine Comedy is essentially a Christian epic and is considered the greatest of  Christian allegories ever written.

Map of Hell
Map of Hell

Link below to an article I wrote for the Sunday Times on “Inferno.”

http://www.sundaytimes.lk/130616/plus/inferno-a-formulaic-dan-brown-thriller-but-still-enriching-48724.html

 

 

Heaven or hell? Which way are you headed???

There is good news and then there is bad news but you have no choice  in deciding in  which order you want to read about it because  I‘ve decided to give the good news first. (It’s good news for some of us)  The good news is that Pope Francis has suggested that non-believers (non-Catholics) can book a place for themselves in heaven if they do well while serving time on this dear old earth of ours. The news was good for people like me who are weary of religious teachings that force dogma down people’s throats and give them little space to think freely. After all heaven doesn’t seem such a bad place going by the rosy picture that has been drawn about it by propagators of its existence.agnostic2

But as always good news does not hold sway for long and the bad news soon followed. This time, by way of a statement, the Vatican quickly countered the Pope’s claim and said there is no such chance for non-believers. Be ye   good or bad, you have no place in heaven which I suppose means great many of us are headed straight to hell.

People’s faith or the religion they choose to follow is strictly their own business as far as I am concerned but I also find it fascinating how   , even in this age, when we’ve gone way ahead of the age of enlightenment (or at least I’d like to believe so)   any talk of God, heaven and hell still stirs up quite a lot of controversy.

And going by all the commotion caused by the comments by the newly elected Pope Francis, it looks like he’ll have to learn to mind his words if he is to survive for long as the head of the worldwide Catholic Church.

I don’t see anything wrong with the Pope’s assertion that heaven is not the exclusive domain of good Catholics alone.  Even if I don’t believe in the concept of heaven and hell as taught by some religions, what the Pope said can be taken metaphorically. Heaven and hell are both right here on this earth .That is more the reality. If people are told good will happen to those who do good and bad will happen to those who do bad, then maybe more people will do good irrespective of what their religious   beliefs are.

Instead, trying to assert that only people who follow a particular faith can find a place in an imaginary utopian world called heaven is unhelpful and does little good, except maybe for those who want to stifle people who want to think freely and make up their own minds on what they should or should not believe in.

I’ll stick with what  John Lennon said: – Imagine there’s no heaven, It’s easy if you try, No hell below us, above us only sky……………………